Podcast: Evernote for Lawyers- Manage Your Research, Marketing, and Process

I attended Heidi Alexander’s presentation on Evernote for Lawyers at ABA TECHSHOW 2017 and thought at the time that she should be a guest on our Digital Edge podcast to talk about Evernote. As it turned out we were able to arrange that fairly quickly. Sharon Nelson and I are pleased to allow Heidi an opportunity to further showcase her expertise in our podcast Evernote for Lawyers- Manage Your Research, Marketing, and Process where she discusses basic features for the beginner and tips for the advanced users.

Earlier this year, the American Bar Association published Heidi’s book Evernote as a Law Practice Tool. Heidi Alexander Evernote Book Cover Read some excerpts from the book here. There is even a ebook edition.

I think Evernote and its now-free competition Microsoft OneNote meet a basic need for lawyers more as a free form digital notebook than as a note-taking app. I love the ability to capture web pages so I can easily find and read them later. But both of these have powerful note-taking features. Personally I like the theory of using both Evernote and OneNote, one for personal matters and the other for business.

Alexander-HeidiBut that approach means that you may not become a power user of either program. So I’d encourage you to read all of the linked resources above and see if Evernote is the tool you can use or if your basic use can be upgraded to power user.

But first, enjoy the podcast.

Podcast: Evernote for Lawyers- Manage Your Research, Marketing, and Process

If you only had a short time to live, would one last conference call be your highest priority? NYT: The Lawyer, The Addict

A feature in the New York Times this weekend, The Lawyer, the Addict, is a compelling read, made so in large part by the writer’s viewpoint from outside of the profession.

Those of us in the profession have repeatedly heard the statistics on lawyer depression, addiction and suicide. In every one of those areas our profession ranks worse than most all others. Many of us have lost colleagues to depression and suicide. Lawyers have offices where others bring in their stress, their problems, difficult situations, threats they are concerned about and other such matters. Lawyers are there for every death sentence passed in a criminal trial, but we are also there for corporate “death threats” as well. We even have a name for it- the “bet the company case.”

But I think this story of Peter, dying from the impact of his drug addiction while still maintaining appearances as a partner in a high-powered law firm, breaks some of our assumptions about what addicted lawyer behavior looks like. His last call from his death bed was to call in to a scheduled conference call.

I’ve never met Marty Solomon, but his 50 tweet “tweet storm” response to the article is worth a read, too.

I have no great wisdom to share on this critical topic today. But it bears repeating to say, if you are in trouble, reach out for help. Many bar associations provide crisis counseling to members now. The Oklahoma Bar Association provides 24 hour free crisis counseling to its members, who can call 800-364-7886 any time day or night. There are other community resources for many situations. Ask for help if you need it.

If you only had a short time to live, would one last conference call be your highest priority? NYT: The Lawyer, The Addict